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Index to

Charles Hopkins's Pages

picture of Corporal Charles Hopkins

Hopkins in late 1865. Image care of
Hopkins's book, edited by William Styple.

Charles Hopkins would probably be one of the last persons to call himself a hero. But this modest man who was generous and forgiving demonstrated genuine acts of bravery while undergoing the direst trials during the war. From his selfless act of rescuing his sergeant on the battlefield though he himself was twice wounded, to his hopeful spirit he maintained while imprisoned at Andersonville, Hopkins revealed the true hero within himself through his positive thoughts, words, and deeds. To his comrades, family, friends, and community—to whom he was deeply loyal and devoted—he would be remembered as a kindly soul who always had "the best interests of his country and of humanity at heart."

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The Biography of Charles Hopkins

"He Never Lost Hope or His Sense of Duty": Page 1, Page 2

Charles Hopkins's Page

Memorial Day Address by Charles Hopkins

Related Pages at this Web Site

Philip Kearny at the Battle of Chantilly
The Significance of Veterans Day
Remembering Our Civil War Veterans

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Charles Hopkins: "He Never Lost Hope or His Sense of Duty" - Page 1 of Hopkins's story covers the early years of his life, up to his imprisonment at Andersonville during the Civil War. Page 2 concludes his remarkable life story: how he endured great hardships with patience and perseverance, and lived a long and productive life.

Memorial Day Address by Charles Hopkins - This address by Hopkins was delivered in Boonton, New Jersey, May 31, 1920. Included on this page is an image of the New Jersey monument at Andersonville National Cemetery.

Philip Kearny at the Battle of Chantilly - Included on this page is a recent photo of General Philip Kearny's equestrian statue at Arlington National Cemetery. Hopkins led the efforts in having this statue made and placed upon the grave of his former general. Also included is a picture of the markers to Kearny and Stevens at Ox Hill Battlefield Park. These monuments were placed there in memory of the two generals who fell and died on the battlefield of Chantilly (Ox Hill).

The Significance of Veterans Day - This page includes a picture of Charles Hopkins during the unveiling of Kearny's equestrian statue at Arlington National Cemetery, on November 11, 1914.

Remembering Our Civil War Veterans - The Memorial Day section on this page features an image of Charles Hopkins's Memorial Day button from 1916, when he was 74 years old.



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